October 4, 2015

IN THIS ISSUE: (click CONTINUE READING below to access links.)


LEARNING STORY – PUTTING OURSELVES IN THE POSITION OF STUDENTS
Contributed by Antonio Vendramin
This past Friday afternoon after a busy week at school, many Cambridge staff members participated in a few fun social events. First, we headed over to the Bose Corn Maze where we had a great time answering trivia questions and navigating our way through the corn in teams.

However, this learning story is much more about the second event – Curling. I’ve watched Curling many times on television, but never appreciated the amount of skill involved.  I very quickly found myself on my back after trying to actually curl my first stone. I wasn’t really embarrassed because I know that while everyone had a chuckle, no one was making fun of me. As I continued to try, and try really hard, I began to grow frustrated that I was struggling so much with a task that others made seem so easy. In fact, some teachers who had never curled before looked like experts right away! My struggles had nothing to do with the instruction either. Our teacher broke down the task into small parts, modelled these, and gave us ample time to practice. I just was not going to catch on to this activity without more time and practice.

IMG_2755In that moment, my mind immediately went to our students…your children…who are asked every day to put their learning out there, to risk-take, and to try things that are very difficult for them. I thought of the feeling many students have when they struggle to learn new things.

That’s why I think it’s always important for us all – principals, vice-principals, teachers, parents –  to be learners too. When we put ourselves in these positions – positions where we play the role of the learner – we are made conscious of what it feels like be a little afraid, to take risks, to struggle, and most importantly to persevere and see ourselves get better at something.

Despite the quality of our instruction, not all students will grasp concepts the first, second, or maybe even third time around. I think the most important lesson we can teach children is to always work hard and to keep on trying because with enough time and practice, any of us can be great at something.

So…

When is the last time you put your own learning out there?
Risked?
Failed?
Got up?
Tried again?
Refused to give up?

BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

STUDENT SAFETY NOTES
Parents, a few notes regarding student safety:

  • Children have been climbing on the emergency bin by the dumpsters after school. Falling from this height could cause injury. Even if it’s not your child, please encourage anyone on the emergency bin to get down safely. Thank you!
  • Remind your child to cross streets at designated crosswalks.
  • Children should be wearing helmets if travelling to school on skateboards, scooters, or bikes.
  • All vehicle passengers should be wearing seatbelts in moving vehicles…even in our drop-off zone.
  • Some students have been cutting through the Skylands Complex at 14959 – 58 Avenue on skateboards, scooters, and bikes (some with no helmets) at a high speed. An accident has already occurred where an adult ended up falling down. There is a concern that in the morning the students may end up getting injured by vehicles leaving their garages.

BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

THE IMPORTANCE OF PATTERNING
Contributed by Kelli Vogstad


Have you ever wondered why your child, whether in kindergarten, grade three, or grade seven, is exploring, identifying, creating, and naming patterns in their classrooms at Math time? Even the most scholarly mathematicians can be challenged with studying patterns. Researchers say that when children explore and learn about patterns, we help them build important foundations for later number work. Creating, extending, naming, and talking about patterns help build strong mathematicians. Here at Cambridge, in many of our classrooms, students of all ages are learning about patterns. Patterns are at the heart of math. The ability to recognize and create patterns helps us make predictions based on our observations; this is an important skill in math. Understanding patterns helps prepare children for learning complex number concepts and mathematical operations.

Our BC Math Curriculum, from kindergarten to grade seven, identifies and describes the big ideas behind the tasks and activities students are engaged in and experiencing in their classrooms. These big ideas are:

• We use patterns to represent identified regularities and to form generalizations.
• Patterns allow us to see relationships and develop generalizations.

Patterns are everywhere! From the very simple pattern that repeats with two or three elements, to repeating patterns with multiple elements and attributes. Students are learning to identify and create increasing and decreasing patterns, to name rules for patterns with words, numbers, symbols, and variables. Older students are learning to record and manipulate number patterns using tables, charts, and graphs. Learning about patterns provides students with an understanding of mathematical relationships, a basis for understanding algebra, analyzing data, and solving complex mathematical problems.

We find patterns in math, but we also find patterns in nature, art, music, and literature. Patterns provide a sense of order in what might otherwise appear chaotic. Researchers have found that understanding and being able to identify recurring patterns allow us to make educated guesses, assumptions, and hypothesis; it helps us develop important skills of critical thinking and logic. The knowledge and understanding of patterns can be transferred into all curriculum areas and open many doors where this knowledge can be applied.

We invite families to explore and have fun with patterning at home. Go on a pattern hunt and identify and name patterns all around you. Create patterns with shapes and colours, letters, numbers, and variables. Share them, extend them, and record them. Talk about how patterns influence the world in which we live and the decisions we make.

And so, when you see your child building a repeated pattern with blocks, recording a decreasing number pattern in their math journal, or creating a table of increasing multiples to solve a mathematical problem, you will know that they are building important foundations for future learning.

BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

THIS WEEK IN TWEETS AND IMAGES

Twitter often gets negative press, not because of the tool, but because of the behaviour of the user. Schools are harnessing the power of Twitter to keep their learning communities informed. You can find a summary of tweets here weekly. Better yet, sign up for a Twitter account and follow @CambridgeLearns and you’ll know exactly what’s happening at school!

CLICK HERE FOR A LOOK BACK AT THE PAST WEEK…IN TWEETS!


BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

CAMBRIDGE CARDBOARD CHALLENGE
Our 2nd Annual Cardboard Challenge is only a day away. Our event will take place on October 5th and will be open to all students. Students are encouraged to think carefully about what they plan to create and to perhaps complete some work prior to the event to that they have time to complete their creation.

Shape of the day:

  • 8:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. – Work in class. Teachers with students working in groups on larger projects will sent these students to the gym where they will be supervised.
  • 12:30 p.m. – Projects are brought down to the Gym and Multipurpose room.
  • 1:00 – 2:30 p.m. – Gallery walk

Please watch and discuss the following videos and then decide, “How will YOU show your creativity?”

Movie Sources: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=faIFNkdq96U http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ul9c-4dX4Hk http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TVflkjMKoJY

BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

VIDEO OF THE WEEK – GRIT:THE SECRET TO SUCCESS
Intelligence does not always guarantee success. Watch and discuss the following video with your child and learn more about the quality that best determines future success.

Source: http://youtube.com/watch?v=H14bBuluwB8

BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

QUOTE OF THE WEEK
CQfVf4iUcAEiA5X
BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

IMPORTANT DATES COMING UP

October
5-Cardboard Challenge
8-PAC Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
12-Thanksgiving – Classes not in session
16-Interim Student Learning Communications online
21-Photo Re-takes
22-PAC Halloween Dance – 6:00-8:00 p.m.

23-Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

29-Last day of Running Club

November
10-Remembrance Day Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
11-Remembrance Day – Classes not in session
13-Professional Development Day (held September 2) – Classes not in session
26-27-Grade 7 30-Hour Famine 30-Assembly – 1:45 p.m.

December
4-Term 1 Student Learning Communications sent home
9-Early Dismissal at 1:30 p.m. for Parent/Student/Teacher Conferences
10-Early Dismissal at 1:30 p.m. for Parent/Student/Teacher Conferences
18-Final day of classes before Winter Break

January
4-Classes resume February
8-Family Day – Classes not in session
18-Student-Led Conferences
19-Professional Development Day (held September 3) – Classes not in session

March
14-25-Spring Break – Classes not in session
28-Easter Monday – Classes not in session

April
11-Term 2 Student Learning Communications sent home
13-Early Dismissal at 1:30 p.m. for Parent/Student/Teacher Conferences

May
6-Professional Development Day – Classes not in session
23-Victoria Day – Classes not in session
30-Professional Development Day – Classes not in session

June
1-Parent Tea
3-Kindergarten Orientation
10-Sports Day
17-Grade 7 Celebration
22-Year-End Assembly – 9:00 a.m.
23-Term 2 Student Learning Communications sent home
23-Early Dismissal at 1:30 p.m. for Parent/Student/Teacher Conferences
24-Administration Day – Classes not in session

BACK TO “IN THIS ISSUE”

One thought on “October 4, 2015

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s